Toilet Paper

April 3, 2008

Toilet Paper Options

by Gloria Ng

1. The Family Cloth is a stack of clean cloth strips are left near the toilet and placed in a bucket. Every few days these cloths are washed. These cloths eliminate tree destruction and chemicals used to create tissues. The family cloth also eliminates large packages and fuel used to deliver tissues to the end destination. The family cloth can be made of old t-shirts and spares tissue dust after usage. It can be used for urination with an option for guests to use toilet paper.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/286627/the_family_cloth_vs_toilet_paper_how.html

http://www.greendaily.com/2007/10/01/can-you-give-up-your-toilet-paper/

2. Reprocessing old materials into new products requires: (1)collecting and processing old and used products, (2) manufacturing the recyclables into something new and (3) purchasing the new recycled products. This option requires fuel for collection and delivery and definitely input processes to create something new.

http://www.greendaily.com/glossary/recycling

3. A review of commercial products available in the United States ranksoftness to be of importance for cold and flu season. Here is an informal survey one family made:

Paper napkins: This family noticed the non-recycled napkinas the most comfortable to the touch. It was not “sandpaper” or“waxy.”

Paper towels: Recycled brands could be “stiff” or “noisy” andmay not “even fold.”Tissue paper: Some recycled tissue can be too thin or “seethrough.”Phlegm could go through.

Toilet paper: Recycled brands that are double ply surpass thesingle-ply non-recycled brand.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12318915/

4. Here is a non-profit organization’s review of the productsavailable in the United States. Remember to factor in that fuel is consumed to deliver these to your local store….

A Shopper’s Guide to Home Tissue Products

Shop smart. Save forests.

Facial Tissue | Toilet Paper | Paper Towels | Napkins | Tips

Facial Tissue

If every household in the United States replaced just one box of virginfiber facial tissues (175 sheets) with 100% recycled ones, we couldsave 163,000 trees.

Fluff Out: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Green Forest: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Hankies: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Marcal: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Seventh Generation: 100 ~ 20 ~ PCF

Kleenex: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Puffs: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Source: Natural Resources Defense Council

*Post-consumer content is defined as paper material recovered after it was used, suchas newspapers and office paper. In contrast, pre-consumer paper is from scraps andtrimmings left over from the paper making process.

**PCF ranked as least harmful, followed by TCF or partial PCF; ECF with ozone or hydrogen peroxide; enhanced ECF (ECF with extended or oxygen delignification); and ECF.

Toilet Paper

If every household in the United States replaced just one roll of virginfiber toilet paper (500 sheets) with 100% recycled ones, we could save 423,900 trees.

365 (Whole Foods): 100 ~ >80 ~ PCF

Ambiance: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

April Soft: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Best Value: 100 ~ <40 ~ PCF

Earth First: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Fiesta: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Green Forest: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Marcal: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Planet: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Pert: 100 ~ <40 ~ PCF

Seventh Generation: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Sofpac: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Charmin: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Cottonelle: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Paper Towels

If every household in the United States replaced just one roll of virginfiber paper towels (70 sheets) with 100% recycled ones, we could save 544,000 trees.

365 (Whole Foods): 100 ~ >80 ~ PCF

Atlantic: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Best Value: 100 ~ <40 ~ PCF

Earth First: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Fiesta: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Green Forest: ~ 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Pert: 100 ~ <40 ~ PCF

Marcal: 100 ~ >60 ~ PCF

Planet: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Seventh Generation: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Bounty: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Scott: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Viva: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Napkins

If every household in the United States replaced just one package ofvirgin fiber napkins (250 count) with 100% recycled ones, we could save 1 million trees.

365 (Whole Foods): 100~ >80 ~ PCF

Bella: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Earth First: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Green Forest: 100 ~ 40 ~ PCF

Marcal: 100 ~ >60 ~ PCF

Seventh Generation: 100 ~ 80 ~ PCF

Bounty: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Scott: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Kleenex: 0 ~ 0 ~ ECF

Tips: Three Things You Can Do To Help Save Forests

1. Buy paper products with recycled content — especiallypost-consumer fibers. Look for products that have a high recycledcontent, including high post-consumer content. Post-consumer fibers arerecovered from paper that was previously used by consumers and would otherwise have been dumped into a landfill or an incinerator.

2. Buy paper products made with clean, safeprocesses. Paper products are bleached to make them whiter andbrighter, but chlorine used in many bleaching processes contributes to theformation of harmful chemicals that wind up in our air and water and are highly toxic to people and fish. Look for products labeled totally chlorine-free (TCF) or processed chlorine-free (PCF). In some cases, elemental chlorine-free (ECF) may be acceptable.

3. Tell tissue manufacturers to stop using virgin wood forthrowaway products. If a brand you buy for your home doesn’t haveany recycled content, contact the manufacturer (click here to send a message to paper giant Kimberly-Clark). Tell the company to use more recycled fibers, to avoid sourcing from ecologically valuable forests such as those in the Cumberland Plateau and Canadian boreal, and to ensure any virgin fibers used are certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. Saving forests also helps reduce global warming pollution.

http://www.nrdc.org/land/forests/gtissue.asp

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